How to Ping the Broadcast/Network IP Address

If someone configured Router or Switch, You didn’t know its IP address but you know it was configured in the subnet 172.16.0.x. So now you can directly connect your laptop to the Router or Switch interface and configure your own IP as 172.16.0.20 (anything in the same subnet would work). Then ping the broadcast address of subnet: ping 172.16.0.255 and  find below  result for broadcast IP address.

32 bytes from 172.16.0.20: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.168 ms

32 bytes from 172.16.0.21: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.327 ms

The first response is our own IP, so the second must be the switch (Press Control-C). This technique should work on just about any IP device. If you know the subnet, you can find the IP address.

Ping Broadcast Domain at Once:

If you need to ping several devices in one same subnet and broadcast domain, you can do several commands or ping like the one below.

Router#ping 172.16.0.255

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.0.255, timeout is 2 seconds:

Reply to request 0 from 172.16.0.2, 80 ms
Reply to request 0 from 172.16.0.3, 80 ms
Reply to request 0 from 172.16.0.4, 80 ms
Reply to request 1 from 172.16.0.4, 52 ms
Reply to request 1 from 172.16.0.2, 52 ms
Reply to request 1 from 172.16.0.3, 52 ms
Reply to request 2 from 172.16.0.3, 84 ms
Reply to request 2 from 172.16.0.4, 84 ms
Reply to request 2 from 172.16.0.2, 84 ms
Reply to request 3 from 172.16.0.2, 20 ms
Reply to request 3 from 172.16.0.4, 20 ms
Reply to request 3 from 172.16.0.3, 20 ms

Ping Network Address:

Router#ping 172.16.0.0

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.0.0, timeout is 2 seconds:

Reply to request 0 from 172.16.0.2, 80 ms
Reply to request 0 from 172.16.0.3, 80 ms
Reply to request 0 from 172.16.0.4, 80 ms
Reply to request 1 from 172.16.0.4, 52 ms
Reply to request 1 from 172.16.0.2, 52 ms
Reply to request 1 from 172.16.0.3, 52 ms
Reply to request 2 from 172.16.0.3, 84 ms
Reply to request 2 from 172.16.0.4, 84 ms
Reply to request 2 from 172.16.0.2, 84 ms
Reply to request 3 from 172.16.0.2, 20 ms
Reply to request 3 from 172.16.0.4, 20 ms
Reply to request 3 from 172.16.0.3, 20 ms

Ping all Router Interfaces Once:
You can also do a single ping command to check if all links in the routers are up or not. You can the following below. This works on all kinds of WAN interfaces connected to the router. This command can be helpful during the CCIE lab exam to verify if interfaces are working.

Router#ping 255.255.255.255 rep 1

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 1, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 255.255.255.255, timeout is 2 seconds:

Reply to request 0 from 192.168.15.5, 16 ms
Reply to request 0 from 172.16.1.4, 20 ms
Reply to request 0 from 172.16.1.3, 20 ms
Reply to request 0 from 172.16.1.2, 20 ms

 

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  1. Cletus Schamp says:

    Precisely what I was looking for, appreciate it for putting up.

  2. Alosa says:

    Lovely website! I am loving it!! Pinging both Network and Broadcast IP address are useful for troubleshooting network issues. Thanks!!!

  3. Delawder says:

    Thank you for sharing with us, This post very nice!

  4. Jospeh Midthun says:

    Very nice post. Thanks for sharing

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